Your moments…they could be snapshots. They should be art.

Posts tagged “equine photography

Kiss a Ginger by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams

Today is ‪#‎KissAGingerDay‬, so I propose that ‪#‎horse‬ lovers go out and ‪#‎smooch‬ their favorite red heads!!! Here’s a picture of mine (post pics of yours in the comments below!)

 

Winter-Whispers-by-Michigan-Equine-Photographer-Laura-Adams

 

This image is available as a gallery wrapped canvas or a matted and framed fine art print on my web site BY CLICKING HERE, just navigate to my equine fine art gallery, where you’ll find a wide variety of framing options to match an decor. This makes a stunning statement piece of wall art.

©All rights reserved, http://www.LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com, 2015.  This image is protected by US copyright laws.  Images on this blog may NOT be duplicated, saved, captured, screen captured, scanned, printed, right-click saved, modified, altered, used, displayed, entered into competitions, shared on the Internet, shared with third parties, used on web sites, used in publications (whether in print or via the Internet), or otherwise obtained or used WITHOUT the express written permission from the artist and creator, Laura Adams.  Licensing of images for many of these purposes are available through Laura Adams with a contract and for a fee.  Any intent to circumvent the artist’s revenue through use, display, and/or print will result in legal ramifications and violates US Copyright Law. Contact Laura@LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com for purchase, use, and further details.

Serenity by professional equine photographer, Laura Adams.

Serenity. It’s under-rated.

This was one of those amazing winter days where the snow  gently blanketed everything, the air was still, and despite how cold you’d think it was, it actually wasn’t bad (our past few Michigan winters have gifted me with the ability to think that anything above 0 degrees Fahrenheit that doesn’t involve a blustery sub-zero wind is quite bearable.)

The horses here were quiet and still that day, and seemed to enjoy my company as I took in the beautiful view along side them. One of them stopped, framing the woods in front of us, so that I could capture the sight to share with you. I thought to myself as I was with them that this must be what serenity feels like: peace, beauty, companionship – and I was so happy that I had my camera to document that moment.

 

Serenity

A black horse watches over a snowy woods in a serene scene of Michigan winter by equine photographer, Laura Adams, of http://www.LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com

 

This image is available as a gallery wrapped canvas or a matted and framed fine art print on my web site BY CLICKING HERE, just navigate to my equine fine art gallery, where you’ll find a wide variety of framing options to match an decor. This makes a stunning statement piece of wall art.


2016: This is the beginning…by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art

2016: This is the beginning of anything you want. Go. Make it count!!!

Wishing you and yours an amazing new year from myself and everyone behind the scenes here. May 2016 be your best year ever. Go live your dreams, be surrounded by those you love, and don’t forget to include ‪#‎shenanigans‬ in the mix!

 

This is the beginning of anything you want by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art.jpg

 

©All rights reserved, http://www.LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com, 2015.  This image is protected by US copyright laws.  Images on this blog may NOT be duplicated, saved, captured, screen captured, scanned, printed, right-click saved, modified, altered, used, displayed, entered into competitions, shared on the Internet, shared with third parties, used on web sites, used in publications (whether in print or via the Internet), or otherwise obtained or used WITHOUT the express written permission from the artist and creator, Laura Adams.  Licensing of images for many of these purposes are available through Laura Adams with a contract and for a fee.  Any intent to circumvent the artist’s revenue through use, display, and/or print will result in legal ramifications and violates US Copyright Law. Contact Laura@LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com for purchase, use, and further details.

Don’t you love it when…

…snow flakes stick to muzzle whiskers, and you can see their breath in the air?

 

Icy Whiskers by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art.jpg

Wishing everyone a safe, happy, and prosperous 2016. Go forth and party like rock stars, but please, do so responsibly. I’ll see you all on the other side of 2015!

 

©All rights reserved, http://www.LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com, 2015.  This image is protected by US copyright laws.  Images on this blog may NOT be duplicated, saved, captured, screen captured, scanned, printed, right-click saved, modified, altered, used, displayed, entered into competitions, shared on the Internet, shared with third parties, used on web sites, used in publications (whether in print or via the Internet), or otherwise obtained or used WITHOUT the express written permission from the artist and creator, Laura Adams.  Licensing of images for many of these purposes are available through Laura Adams with a contract and for a fee.  Any intent to circumvent the artist’s revenue through use, display, and/or print will result in legal ramifications and violates US Copyright Law. Contact Laura@LauraAdamsPhotographicArt.com for purchase, use, and further details.


A Public Service Announcement | Michigan Professional Equine Photographer, Laura Adams

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it’s here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland

Get out and enjoy your horses while you can!  I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder – a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall – and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.  

 

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it's here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland Get out and enjoy your horses while you can!  I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder - a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall - and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it’s here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland
Get out and enjoy your horses while you can! I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder – a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall – and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.


Sneak Peek at an Upcoming Horse by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams

Hello.  My name is Laura.  I’m addicted to horses and photography.  I have a problem.  A really big problem.  Do you think you can help?

 

I’m a photographer, and I get super excited about my sessions.  So much so, that I have an incredibly hard time sitting on images until it’s time for the big reveal.  Horribly difficult.  To the point that I think I just might burst.  Last night, I struggled with the urge to share a sneak peek with you of an amazingly beautiful mare who will be up for adoption through New Vocations soon.  I confess that I let that urge win, and I’ve posted an image of said horse.  (::tisk tisk, Laura::)  She has a lovely face and a really kind eye – and LOOK at that shiny coat! 

 

I hope that my friends at New Vocations understand my enthusiasm for sharing – and my complete lack of self control when it comes to putting on my equine photographer hat – I just HAVE to show you the lovely horses that they get into their adoption program.  This mare will be available through their Michigan facility, so keep an eye out on their web site for her listing.  I also happen to know that there’s another lovely one that may be available around the same time (ugh – did I really just type that?  It was supposed to just be my inside voice, not advertised on my blog!!!).  I love photographing the horses at New Vocations, and the people who run their Michigan facility are a pleasure to work with.  I will be posting more images once the horses have been listed and are officially available.

 

I really, really tried to keep this one to myself, but I just couldn’t.  My crazy equine photographer addiction to beautiful pictures of lovely horses wins – again!!!

 

Enjoy.

Image

 ©All rights reserved.  Laura Adams and Laura Adams Photographic Art, 2014.  Images and text on this site may NOT be duplicated, saved, scanned, screen captured, used, altered, posted, modified, or otherwise captured or used in any manner without express written permission from Laura Adams.


“I’m Ready For My Close Up!!!” How to Introduce Light Modifiers to Your Equine Sessions | By Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams

Horses have been a major part of my life for longer than some of you have been alive, and I’ve been obsessed with photographing them (and everything else) since I was a child.  So as a photographer combining the two, I have a lot of experience introducing my four-legged friends to things that may otherwise seem scary.  In fact, it’s often more difficult for me to convince horse owners that their horse(s) will probably be pretty curious about some of the things I work with than it is to convince their horses to be curious about them.  One of the tools I use most often are reflectors, and I have them in various sizes from handheld to full equine body size.  They are usually on spring-form frames that pop open, bend, and twist in a variety of ways, and they do move in the wind.  Sure, in the right circumstances they really could be scary to a horse, and while I wouldn’t really want to come across one in the woods on the back of my horse, from the ground, horses seem to be really, REALLY interested in them.  So interested, in fact, that there are some lip marks and horse schmooze on several of them because some ponies just can’t not touch them.

 

Take this Standardbred mare, for instance – she was so interested in this reflector that she kept gravitating towards it and was compelled to touch it.  She walked up to it several times, sniffed it, pushed it, touched it – she couldn’t stay away, and I’m pretty sure if we’d have handed her the handled she just might have carried it around for us.

How to Introduce Light Modifiers to Your Equine Sessions | A tutorial on how to add lighting to your equine horse photography sessions by Michigan professional equine photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of the Ann Arbor Washtenaw County area.

How to Introduce Light Modifiers to Your Equine Sessions | A tutorial on how to add lighting to your equine horse photography sessions by Michigan professional equine photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of the Ann Arbor Washtenaw County area.

So, how do you  get a horse to accept such scary lighting aids?

 

It’s actually pretty simple.  I always start with it away from the horse.  If you snap one of these babies open unexpectedly next to a horse, you WILL be chasing it into the next county.  You’ll only make that mistake once (I promise), and good luck getting it close enough to the horse to be useful.  Ever.  So open it far enough away that the horse doesn’t perceive it as an eminent danger.

 

Open it in an area where the horse isn’t confined with it.  If the horse feels confined or threatened, there goes your session.  Everyone, handlers, photographer, lighting assistant(s) need to be calm and approach this scenario as if it’s perfectly normal for people to walk around with reflectors, soft boxes, strobe equipment (whatever).  If the handlers are nervous or apprehensive, the horse will pick up on it.

 

Take your time and make the introduction the one part of your work that isn’t on a time frame.  An extra five or ten minutes right here will make or break your session.  Lighting your images takes them to a completely different level, so this is a really important step for creating amazing images.  Relax and take your time here!

 

If the horse is interested in the equipment, GREAT!  Let the horse look at it.  If the horse wants to step closer, allow it.  If the horse wants to touch it, feel it, sniff it – allow it – so long as the horse isn’t fearful of it and it doesn’t pose a danger, let them investigate.  I’ve had this take less than ten seconds, and as long as five minutes, and to date, I’ve not had a horse that’s minded any of it.  The secret sauce is in the introduction!  If the horse is fearful, go back to the first step and start over.

 

If you’re using any kind of studio lighting equipment, always, always, ALWAYS sandbag everything.  You don’t want to ruin your shoot by a soft box being bumped and turning into a kite with a little bit of wind (and your expensive light attached).  Have a large enough area to comfortably work in and make certain your set has obvious and expansive enter and exit areas.  A horse isn’t likely to try to run over top of you or your equipment, but they will knock over anything in their way if they’re convinced something is going to “get” them.  Do not let that happen.  Ever.

 

Adding light to your sessions will take your photography to an entirely different level.  Practice with your own horses first to find your own way to add these tools into your work comfortably.  Having good, solid horse-handling skills is critical if you’re photographing horses, and a working knowledge of what makes them tick, their anatomy, and how to light them to flatter their beauty are essential to the job.  Good luck!!!