Your moments…they could be snapshots. They should be art.

Posts tagged ““Michigan photographer”

A Public Service Announcement | Michigan Professional Equine Photographer, Laura Adams

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it’s here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland

Get out and enjoy your horses while you can!  I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder – a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall – and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.  

 

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it's here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland Get out and enjoy your horses while you can!  I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder - a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall - and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.

Reminder: enjoy our gorgeous summer weather while it’s here with us, winter is going to be back here before we know it!!! #horses #equinephotographer #equinephotography #MIequinephotographer #MI #horse #snow #winterwonderland
Get out and enjoy your horses while you can! I am in the process of gearing up for my high school senior portrait season to move into full swing, and came across this timely reminder – a horse grazing in a snow covered pasture during a heavy snowfall – and it reminded me to get out and spend some time with my favorite horse (and horses) while we have the chance.

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One for My Fellow Photographers, Four Ways to Get Prospects Returning Your Calls, by Guest Blogger Lana Adams, GCA,CSA

I love to share things with my fellow photographers, and this is a gem!  So many people enter into our business, barely know how to use a camera, and have no business or sales experience.  It’s kind of a disaster.  That is why 80% of photographers are out of business within just a few years (!), and why people are able to find “fauxtographers” out there willing to do a $50 photo shoot that includes a CD (Dear Clients: I do not offer that service.  I have a degree in visual arts, and have invested significant amounts of time, resources, and finances to provide you with amazing photography, art, and products that you will not find anywhere else.  There is a lot of value in that, and I’m priced accordingly.  That doesn’t usually appeal to bargain shoppers, but it does appeal to people who are looking for phenomenal images of their moments and loved ones!)  So, when I first read this article I felt the need to share it with my colleagues – so many people just don’t follow up – and when we fail to do that, someone else gets the job.  Don’t let that happen.  This is brought to you by guest blogger (and my doppleganger womb-mate) Lana Adams, who specializes in motivating people to find and follow their sales leads, create sales opportunities, identify target markets, and increase sales and productivity.  You can find Lana on LinkedIn (http://linkd.in/1h1jv1k) – be sure to check out her other articles on sales tips, techniques, and info, and follow her on Twitter (@LanaA001).

 

 

FOUR WAYS TO GET PROSPECTS RETURNING YOUR CALLS

By Guest Blogger, Lana Adams, GCA,CSA

 

With as many as 50 percent of all sales going to the first salesperson to reach the customer, it’s not only vital that we reply to prospective customers quickly but when we do, we must have a message and strategy in place that compels them to respond. As salespeople, it’s easy for us to blame the customer when they fail to respond to our follow-up attempts or stop returning our calls. “They’re busy”, “They weren’t that interested, anyway”. We’ve all heard the fabricated excuses designed to blame the customer for our failure: as sales professionals, we failed to sound different – be different – think differently – than our competitors’ sales force.

Here are four simple steps to create voicemail and email messages that customers can’t help but respond to:

  1. Think like a customer. What would get you to pick up the phone? Here’s a hint: it’s not the standard and boring “Hi it’s Lana with ABC Company and I’m calling to follow-up with you on your product inquiry. My number is 555-1212.” Yawn. They just got that very same voicemail message from three of your competitors. Your message needs to sound different. It needs to sound energetic and contagiously enthusiastic. “Hi Ms. Johnson. This is Lana with ABC Company and I’d love to learn more about your storage needs and whether our unique and exciting solutions might be the answer you’re looking for. My direct line is 555-1212.” Practice by leaving messages for yourself. Do you sound energetic? Is your enthusiasm for your product contagious? If not, keep practicing until you convince yourself.
  2. Give your prospective customer a reason to speak with you personally. If you tell them everything they need to know (pricing, availability, benefits) in your message, congratulations! You’ve just eliminated their need to speak with you. Instead, dangle a proverbial carrot and pique their curiosity so they’ll want to learn more. Share something of value, something relevant, something interesting — but don’t tell them what they want most, which is likely to be pricing. “Good morning, Ms. Johnson. This is Lana with ABC Company and our storage solutions help homeowners more than triple their storage capacity. I’m excited to tell you how.”
  3. Your message must be brief. Challenge yourself to use no more than three sentences and never, ever, give away your pricing, availability, or other pertinent details in a voicemail or email. If you’re leaving a voicemail message, do so in an environment with few distractions to avoid any hesitations, stammering, or breaks.
  4. Don’t give anything away. Only rookies start offering discounts right away. You don’t know that the customer has a price objection and the customer may not yet know or understand your value proposition. Discounts mean lower profits and lower profits mean less money for everyone. Using a discount to entice a prospect into calling you promises to turn your next conversation into price haggling.

Start building your own library of messages to use with customers based on your pipeline stage and where you’re at in the sales process. Have a minimum of three compelling messages that can be used for each stage and continually build your collection to keep the ones that work best and toss the ones that didn’t seem effective.

Improving the caliber of your messages not only helps you increase the number of customers you’re able to touch but also decreases the chances your prospects will fall off the radar or into your competitors’ hands.

 


Blair Burk Roping Clinic by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams

Stepping out of your comfort zone is a great thing.

 

This past weekend, I had an opportunity to do just that.  I have some clients (turned friends) who are pretty involved in the world of roping.  I’m a life-long horse lover and owner, but outside of a few rodeos, I’ve never been exposed to this discipline.  Most of my work has an equine fine art/portraiture theme, and it seems that I’m usually so busy doing that kind of work that I rarely have the opportunity to get out and push myself into exploring other avenues.  So, when my friends contacted me and asked if I’d be interested in shooting their upcoming clinic, I thought at the least it would be a fantastic opportunity to explore a different type of shooting than what I normally do (I’m also pretty sure that there was the promise of newborn foals on the property that may or may not have been used as photographer bait…)

 

There were 14 participants in the clinic to work with Blair Burk, a 14 time NFR qualifier, who came all the way to Michigan from Oklahoma.  I caught some of their practice outside, and then they moved to the indoor arena for some hands-on work.  Shooting fast action shots in an indoor arena can be quite a challenge, as the lighting is notoriously less-than-ideal, but after a few test shots I found a happy place that my camera, lens, and the available light could play well together with.  Knowing next to nothing about roping, I paid attention to what seemed to be the highlights of each run, got familiar with the lighting, and then saw where the magic in that arena was happening at.  We had some daylight streaming in from the perimeter of the arena, which gave us some backlight in virtually every direction, and then some overhead tungsten spotlights which put off very selective pools of yellow light.  All of that light, combined with the dust being stirred up by horses, people, and calves – made for what I think are some fantastic shots of the clinic participants doing what they love.

 

I had arrived thinking I’d shoot for an hour or two, but wound up staying until well into the evening.  I was having so much fun experimenting and working in my zone that time literally slipped away from me (always a good thing when work doesn’t seem like work and the time flies by!).  I’ve spent the past three days working 16 hour days to sort through all of those images, pick the best of them, and edit them in my post-production process to get them prepped for viewing.  You can see the entire gallery of images here: http://lauraadamsphoto.zenfolio.com/p1023210276

 

Images from the calf roping clinic with 14 time NFR qualifier Blair Burk from Oklahoma at Henderson's Arena and Track in Grass Lake, Michigan by Michigan Professional Equine Photographer, Laura Adams, of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of south east Michigan.

Images from the calf roping clinic with 14 time NFR qualifier Blair Burk from Oklahoma at Henderson’s Arena and Track in Grass Lake, Michigan by Michigan Professional Equine Photographer, Laura Adams, of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of south east Michigan.

 

 

©All rights reserved.  Laura Adams and Laura Adams Photographic Art, 2014.  Images and text on this site may NOT be duplicated, saved, scanned, screen captured, used, altered, posted, modified, or otherwise captured or used in any manner without express written permission from Laura Adams.  (You may use the FB share feature on my Facebook page, OR pin this on Pinterest using the button below!)


Muzzle by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams

Where is your happy place?  Mine is always somewhere around horses: in the barn, kissing a velvety soft muzzle, having one of my four legged friends sniff me down for treats, the smell of hay and carrot breath…

 

I took this image a few years ago, and it’s available as a fine art print in my on-line gallery HERE..  It’s one of my favorite views, and I know there are tons of other horse-crazy people out there that will understand where I’m coming from.  Yeah, I’m in love with this nose.  I’m also in love with every other nose that I come across.

 

They are totally, utterly, and completely addictive, aren’t they?

 

Equine fine art photograph featuring the muzzle of a horse with delicate details, by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of the Ann Arbor and metro Detroit areas of Michigan.

Equine fine art photograph featuring the muzzle of a horse with delicate details, by Michigan Equine Photographer Laura Adams of Laura Adams Photographic Art based out of the Ann Arbor and metro Detroit areas of Michigan.

©All rights reserved.  Laura Adams and Laura Adams Photographic Art, 2014.  Images and text on this site may NOT be duplicated, saved, scanned, screen captured, used, altered, posted, modified, or otherwise captured or used in any manner without express written permission from Laura Adams.  (You may use the FB share feature below, OR pin this on Pinterest using the button below!)